BCCI: Court quashes petition against Srinivasan

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November 12, 2014

Media reports on Tuesday (November 11) said that the Bombay High Court turned down a public interest litigation (PIL) petition filed by the Cricket Association of Bihar (CAB) that had alleged conflict of interest on the part of N Srinivasan, the former BCCI president and the current chairman of the International Cricket Council.

November 12, 2014

Media reports on Tuesday (November 11) said that the Bombay High Court turned down a public interest litigation (PIL) petition filed by the Cricket Association of Bihar (CAB) that had alleged conflict of interest on the part of N Srinivasan, the former BCCI president and the current chairman of the International Cricket Council.

The development comes as a boost to N Srinivasan, who has hopes of returning for another term as BCCI president during the forthcoming elections.

The petition was filed by Aditya Verma, secretary of CAB, challenging two amendments brought out by BCCI in its rules, allegedly to favor Srinivasan. Verma had called for the creation of an independent governance review committee to review the rules and regulations of the BCCI.

The petition alleged that the rules and regulations of the board had been modified to meet the demands of a few individuals, and pointed to Srinivasan’s ownership of the Indian Premier League (IPL) franchise Chennai Super Kings, via India Cements, while still the president of the BCCI as a case in point.

However, according to the Press Trust of India, a Division Bench headed by Justice Anoop Mohota said the petition was based on presumptions and assumptions that couldn’t be considered by the court, and refused to interfere with the decision of the BCCI's general body in carrying out the amendments in its rules.

The development comes as a boost to Srinivasan, who has hopes of returning for another term as board president during the forthcoming elections.

However, Srinivasan’s future could depend on the Supreme Court’s Friday hearing on the final report submitted by the Mudgal Committee on the IPL spot-fixing scandal. After a probe spanning nearly six months, the committee had submitted a preliminary report in February this year, where the role of Srinivasan, the then BCCI president, was questioned, and M Gurunath, his son-in-law and former team principal of Chennai Super Kings, was indicted. The committee had also reportedly named 12 cricketers for possible participation in corrupt practices.

The Supreme Court, after going through the report, ordered the committee to conduct a deeper probe, the report for which was submitted on November 3.

Though there were no formal charges against Srinivasan, he had to step down as the president of the BCCI after a Supreme Court order because of the involvement of his company, India Cements Limited, with Chennai Super Kings in an ownership capacity.


Courtesy: Wisden India