Indian and Pakistani Americans Make Time’s ‘100 Most Influential’ List

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April, 2012

Two Indian Americans, Preet Bharara and Salman Khan, have been recognized for their contributions to society in Time Magazine’s 2012 list of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World.” Other South Asian individuals include Pakistani filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, Indian activist Anjali Gopalan and politician Mamata Banerjee.

April, 2012

Two Indian Americans, Preet Bharara and Salman Khan, have been recognized for their contributions to society in Time Magazine’s 2012 list of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World.” Other South Asian individuals include Pakistani filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, Indian activist Anjali Gopalan and politician Mamata Banerjee.

Preet Bharara, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York

Bharara, 43, is the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York. Bharara and his office have played a vital role in several high caliber corporate and crime cases such as the Raj Rajaratnam case. Time reported that Bharara and his team were also credited for convicting Faisal Shahzad, one of the Times Square bombers.

Khan, 35, is recognized for spearheading the Khan Academy, a nonprofit that provides free educational videos online. Time reported that the Web site has provided over 3,000 lessons to students and that the ultimate goal of the Khan Academy is to provide a “free, world-class education” to every child.

 

 

Obaid-Chinoy, 33, one of the first Pakistani filmmakers to receive an Academy Award for the documentary “Saving Face,” is dedicated to capturing the stories of survivors while spreading awareness about acid violence and various injustices that exist in the world today.

 

 

Mamta Banerjee, 57, chief minister of West Bengal, is credited for helping end communist rule in the state after establishing a grassroots movement.

 

 

 

 

Gopalan, 54, an activist in India, is the founder and executive director of The Naz Foundation India Trust, an NGO that educates the larger community about HIV prevention and treatment. After witnessing the lack of action and stigma against populations in India affected by HIV, Gopalan launched The Naz Foundation India Trust, based in New Delhi.

 

 


Courtesy: indiawest