Basketball team Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan issues statement on controversial N.C. law

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April 27, 2016

Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan on Tuesday issued a statement on behalf of the organization in opposition of the controversial North Carolina law known as HB2.

Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan – Getty Images

April 27, 2016

Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan on Tuesday issued a statement on behalf of the organization in opposition of the controversial North Carolina law known as HB2.

Charlotte Hornets owner Michael Jordan – Getty Images

“As my organization has stated previously, the Charlotte Hornets and Hornets Sports & Entertainment are opposed to discrimination in any form, and we have always sought to provide an inclusive environment,” Jordan said in a statement.

“As has been the case since the building opened, we will continue to ensure that all fans, players and employees feel welcome while at work or attending NBA games and events at Time Warner Cable Arena.”

Jordan’s statement was made in response to an interview request from the Charlotte Observer regarding HB2, whose critics argue is discriminatory to the LGBT community because it requires individuals to only use public restrooms that align with their biological birth gender, not which one to which they identify.

Interestingly, as noted by Ball Don’t Lie, Jordan’s statement issued Tuesday is the same statement the Hornets organization released in reaction to when HB2 originally was passed last month.

Jordan always has been reticent to take public stances on controversial social and/or political issues – for which he has drawn criticism – once allegedly stating, “Republicans buy sneakers, too,” although the veracity of the quote and that it was actually made by Jordan has been called into question.

Either way, the fact that Jordan doubled-down on the Hornets’ initial statement — without actually taking a personal stance in some respects — makes it clear that the league and North Carolina are at odds over the HB2 law, especially given NBA commissioner Adam Silver recently said that the 2017 All-Star Game, slated to be held in Charlotte, could be moved should North Carolina not change the "problematic" law.


Courtesy – YB (Sportress of Blogitude)

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